Categories
Experience Reports Ramblings

Why I believe that manual testing is a great job

I’ve had a fairly varied career and in 2019 I took the unusual step of going from a developer to a manual tester. I’m glad that I made this choice and this post explores why.

I’ve had an unusual journey to my current role (Senior Test Engineer, doing primarily manual testing).

My career started as a QA tester in games as a “foot in the door” to be a games developer. This was very common in the industry. However after establishing myself and becoming a Senior, I moved to Games Design rather than development. Being games, I was eventually redundant and with the desire to get paid again, I took a role as a Software Test Engineer.

I was good at it. I learnt new techniques and skills. I was using Wireshark to see communications between devices and understand why things may be behaving incorrectly. However I was also bored. Most of our testing was running test cases that had been written (and often already executed) by the developers. I then moved into an “Engineering Support” role where I’d take on all support cases passed to Engineering, taking the load off our senior & lead developers. I loved trying to analyse the system and using my “tester brain”, but constantly handling escalated cases with no useful information was miserable.

This is when I made the leap to development. After 5 solid years, working on a variety of different products, I was at the stage where I really needed to be taking on the responsibility to become a senior software engineer but I have very little appetite for it. Instead of taking the lead on new development technologies and emerging languages I found myself more interested in improving our testing. When the opportunity for a senior manual test engineer role came up, I went for it.

A few people have asked me “why?” and treat it as a step down (and even a waste of my talents), however I believe that it has made me more valuable to the company

I like to feel that I am a fairly creative person and am also good at problem solving & analysing data. This lends well to both professions. There’s common ground like being involved in the planning phase, breaking down a feature and identifying the risks and challenges that are there. The “tester brain” is really handy here. Developers then get to flex their brain in designing the code to solve the problem whilst testers will be performing exploratory testing and identifying things that were hard to see when the feature was conceptual. Whilst developers get the thrill of seeing the code they’ve written become a feature that customers use, I certainly enjoy the buzz of finding a bug. Finally there’s debugging. I can really hunting through logs, network traces and code to understand a “weird bug”. This applies to both roles (and is something I’ll touch on in a later blog).

Testing can be boring and laborious, especially when you are mainly doing “checking”. Being given a bunch of things to check, following a load of steps then providing the result is rubbish. It is just as bad as writing what seemed like endless documentation during my time in development.

During my time in development I was always undone by build infrastructure. Particularly with C++ and Apple-based applications, I had a torrid time getting things built for the first time and often my projects were light on feature work and about pulling in latest dependencies etc. I didn’t understand most of the failures or why it wouldn’t just work. Words cannot describe how happy I am that this is a rare occurrence for me nowadays (although newer technologies do seem to have alleviated a lot of the pain here).

Ultimately I prefer manual testing to development. I find that I get to spend more time doing the interesting bit (finding bugs vs writing feature code) and that because (I believe that) I am a great tester and an decent developer, I add a lot more value to the company in helping us deliver quality features in my current role than as a tester.

But what about automation testing?

What I loved about development is seeing something work. Knowing that it will be deployed for customers to use. I felt like I was making a difference in delivering the product. Automation includes the same enjoyment of writing code but ultimately it lacks that feature delivery buzz. As a role it feels inferior to being a developer. You’re doing the less interesting development tasks. Similarly if I’m spending my time writing automated tests, I am not doing exploratory testing. I am not digging through logs and code to see if I can understand the behaviour.

I believe that writing scripts, tools and on occasion tests to reduce my effort and time spent doing boring work is a valuable use of my time. Automation can be great here but to check that the ACs are in place, it is usually quicker to fire up the software and check. Then I can focus on experimenting and exploration, the best bit of being a test engineer.

So the next time someone asks as to whether I’d want to become an automation test engineer, perhaps I should ask “why would I want to do that?”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.